Printable VersionTRAINING AIDES

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - SKIT

© 9/20/97 Brian Schuldt

Permission for this skit to be used for the education of Scouters worldwide has been given by the author. This skit may be copied for educational purposes only. This copyright information must remain a part of any reproductions of this skit.

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CAST:SM & Scout walking
Narrator (______________________________ )
Scoutmaster: Mr. Clark (______________________________ )
Assistant Scoutmaster: Mr. Jones (______________________________ )
Senior Patrol Leader: Billy (______________________________ )
Patrol leader: Ricky (______________________________ )
1st Class Scout: John (______________________________ )
New Scout with AD/HD -Mike Anderson (______________________________ )
Mike’s Mom: Mrs. Anderson (______________________________ )

SETTING--- TYPICAL SCOUT TROOP MEETING:

  • SM, SPL, and ASM talking about meeting plan at left side back.
  • 1st Class Scout (John) and AD/HD Scout (Mike) standing to the right side front.
  • Ricky: at left side front reading Boy's Life.
  • Neck signs announce roles (important to have).

NARRATOR (Rod Serling face)(affect Rod’s voice mannerisms)

COME WITH ME, IF YOU WILL, TO A PLACE WHERE FANTASTIC THINGS ARE ACCOMPLISHED, WHERE REALITY IS TWISTED, WHERE TIME STOPS.

TO A PLACE WHERE MOUNTAINOUS CHALLENGES ARE OVERCOME WITH NOTHING MORE THAN AN AGREEMENT TO WORK TOGETHER, A PLACE WHERE MERE BOYS CAN SOAR LIKE EAGLES, COME WITH ME TO THE TROOP ZONE.


NARRATOR: (raise arm like a curtain) CURTAIN

Mike — John, you said I could work on my Scout rank, you promised me last week.

John — Just a minute Mike, I need to talk to the Scoutmaster.

Mike — But you promised me you would help me first thing!

John —This is more important. (John exits left)

Mike — Fine! (Walks quickly to other side of the stage up to Ricky) John doesn’t like me!

PL Ricky — Why do you think that?

Mike — He won’t help me with my stuff.

PL Ricky — What do you want to do?

Mike — I want to get my Scout badge, I know I am ready for it. I am doing all kinds of stuff. I wrote a skit, I made up a new yell for my patrol, I want to give the flaming arrows a dingle dangle I made, it is so cool, it has leather flames and every thing! I made a new flag for the patrol at a meeting Saturday that I called at my house, I want to go on the hike next Saturday, I made a flyer on Dad’s computer to recruit kids in my class, I am working on two merit badges, pets and ---uh—another one, and I want to do a service project at the retirement center, all I need to do is say the Scout Law and have somebody sign my book. Here, listen:

A Scout is trustworthy, a Scout is loyal, a Scout is courteous, a Scout is friendly, a Scout is courteous, a Scout is kind, a Scout is loyal, a Scout is obedient, a Scout is reverent, a Scout is brave, a Scout is happy. There!

PL Ricky — Wait a second, Mike, I think you might have skipped one.

MikeI DID NOT!, A Scout is trustworthy, a Scout is loyal, a Scout is courteous, a Scout is courteous, a Scout is friendly, a Scout is kind, a Scout is loyal, a Scout is obedient. There !!!

PL Ricky — Mike, maybe you are right, let me see your Scout book and we can check together. Did you bring your Scout book tonight?

Mike — Uh ….. Oh forget it! I knew you didn’t want to help me, nobody likes me! (moves to where Scoutmaster Clark is.)

(Ricky exits right)

Mike —Mr. Clark, Mr. Clark! I really need to talk to you. Now!

SM Mr. Clark — Just a minute, Guys. What can I help you with Mike?

Mike Nobody will help me! Nobody likes me!, I want to call my Mom, I want to go home!

ASM Mr. Jones — Settle down Mike, did you remember your pills today?

(Mr. Clark raises hand to stop Mr. Jones’ questioning)

Mike I don’t know, can I call my Mom?

SPL Billy — Hey I have a good idea! Hey, Mike, how about it if I help you with the things you want to accomplish tonight? Now what would you most like to get done tonight?

Mike I want to get the Scout Law done so I be a Scout rank. But I forgot my book. (slaps head)

SM Mr. Clark — Hey, no problem Mike, Billy can work with you and we can sign it off later, ok?

Mike Ok!

SM Mr. Clark — After you get that completed, then you and I can have your Scoutmaster Conference, and I want to hear about all your great Ideas! And all other neat things you can do, Ok?

Mike OK!!!

NARRATOR — "AND CURTAIN"


NARRATOR A bright young Scout, energetic, creative, hardworking, resourceful, sensitive, a great kid!

OR  would you say excitable, distractible, forgetful, moody, difficult, an attitude problem, a challenge, he won’t last in scouting?

Did you see a normal kid on any day, or did you catch a glimmer of something else?

Is Mike one of THOSE kids, you know, one of those HYPER KIDS? How will the Troop handle him?


NARRATOR "AND CURTAIN"

ASM, Mr. Jones and Mrs. Anderson, Mikes mom, enter stage left

ASM Mr. Jones — So, Mrs. Anderson, I wanted to talk to you out here so we could discuss a problem, I will come straight to the point. Mike is really disrupting the Troop meetings, is he one of those hyperactivity disorder kids?

NARRATOR — "CURTAIN, CURTAIN!!!" (Mr. Jones and Mrs. Anderson, exit stage left)


NARRATOR — I Object!!! I’m Sorry, I did not know the assistant Scoutmaster was going to LABEL THIS BOY. I hope that Mrs. Anderson was not too offended.

Parents love their kids, warts and all. They are also very protective of their kids if there is a condition. It is imperative that you enlist their assistance in discovering the Needs and Characteristics of their son, to enable you to help their Scout to succeed.

Unless you are a Medical Doctor and have done the testing, you do not have the prerogative to diagnose and label a Scout. If you notice symptoms in a Scout, which might indicate ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER, do approach the parent to discuss the issue, perhaps like this----


NARRATOR —"AND CURTAIN"

(ASM--Mr. Jones and Mrs. Anderson, Mikes mom, enter stage left)

ASM Mr. Jones — So, Mrs. Anderson, I wanted to talk to you out here so we could discuss an issue. I didn’t want you to feel uncomfortable by talking in front of the boys. Mike seems to be having a bit of trouble fully joining in the Troop meetings. We want him to have the greatest time of his life in Scouting. Can you suggest some ways or ideas we can use to help him feel more part of the Troop?

Mrs. Anderson — Well… I have been afraid to mention this, .... but, ….well…. I had to start Mike on some medication to help him concentrate in school; Dr. Holman wanted to start with a low dosage. I was really hoping it would carry over into the evening. I don’t want to give him any medication after school because it kills his appetite and he has trouble sleeping. The Doctor thinks it might be Attention Deficit Hyper-Activity Disorder.

ASM Mr. Jones — From what I know, medication for AD/HD will not cure the problem, it can help the boy to focus. I want you to know that this information will help us to adjust the Scouting program to help Mike achieve more than you can imagine. But we will need your help, mostly in information. If you would like to join the Troop as a leader, we would welcome you in. As a matter of fact Adult Basic Training is about to start and I was ……

NARRATOR — "CURTAIN, CURTAIN!!"


NARRATOR — There he goes again… Anyway, I think Mr. Jones handled that much better this time. But what if the parent is not forthcoming with information and you still suspect AD/HD is the issue? Structured schedules are very helpful in guiding the boy and more importantly, preparing the boy for the changes he will shortly encounter. Give the Scout a copy of the schedule. Make a poster showing the steps to a multi-step task such as dishwashing or food preparation, laminate it and post it for all the boys to use. As we saw earlier these are the boys who can handle a challenge; if they are going to get into trouble it is because they have too much free time. Give them appropriate things to do. Monitor them so they do not get too tired, provide short rest times and snacks where they can recharge the batteries and concentrate anew.

Speaking about batteries, have you remembered to get your extra batteries for Summer Camp?

(Rod Serling face) COME WITH ME, POSTULATE FOR A MOMENT, A REALM WHERE ONE BOY HAS AD/HD.

YOU HAVE ENTERED THE SUMMER CAMP ZONE. (face down)

Hey, with all we now know, not a problem, (Rod Serling face) Consider this, FIVE BOYS WITH AD/HD. Before you vow to never go to summer camp due to this possibility; communicate with all the parents prior to Summer camp to discover the individual needs of the boys. If you know the boys are on medication, find out if they will be taking it or if they will be on a medication vacation. Ask the parents to try and arrange for the medication to stop a few weeks prior to camp to allow the chemical changes to stabilize. Perhaps also see if the parents can come to camp for a few days to assist.

Communicate with the boys and give them schedules. Post a clock where they can take responsibility for the time. Stand back and be amazed at what these boys can do.

MOST OF ALL, GIVE THEM LOTS OF PRAISE AND ENCOURAGEMENT, CHAMPION THE GOOD BEHAVIORS overlook some of the less desirable things, and see what mountains can be climbed.

Community Resources are available for further information;

I have a handout here with the local Number for CHADD, Children and Adults with AD/HD. I would also like to point out this Scout publication, Scouting for Youth with Learning Disabilities; © BSA publication # 33065. Let's not forget the Working With Scouts With disAbilities web site at http://wwswd,org

Oh, before I forget, let’s give our fine actors some praise for their excellent performance. (PAUSE)

Thank You. I would like to now open the floor to your questions and concerns, I may not know the answer, but maybe I can point you in the right direction.

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This page was last edited 11/15/09